Notice & Comment

Notice & Comment

Notice & Comment

Benefits of a Rowdy Bureaucracy

This is is the third post in a series on Andrew Rudalevige’s new book, By Executive Order: Bureaucratic Management and the Limits of Presidential Power. For other posts in the series, click here. Perhaps because they bear the president’s signature and don’t require ratification, executive orders are considered to be entirely within the president’s control. But early […]

Notice & Comment

Is Presidential Administration Harder for Republican Presidents?, by William Yeatman

This is is the second post in a series on Andrew Rudalevige’s new book, By Executive Order: Bureaucratic Management and the Limits of Presidential Power. For other posts in the series, click here. Andrew Rudalevige’s By Executive Order: Bureaucratic Management and the Limits of Presidential Power is an important contribution to our understanding of modern policymaking. In […]

Notice & Comment

Executive Order Formation and the Duration of Policy, by Sharece Thrower

This is is the first post in a series on Andrew Rudalevige’s new book, By Executive Order: Bureaucratic Management and the Limits of Presidential Power. For other posts in the series, click here. Andrew Rudalevige’s new book, By Executive Order: Bureaucratic Management and the Limits of Presidential Power, significantly advances our conceptual, theoretical, and empirical understanding of […]

Notice & Comment

Introduction to Our Symposium on Rudalevige’s By Executive Order

Welcome to our second symposium of the month!* We close out October with a series of essays reacting to Prof. Andrew Rudalevige‘s By Executive Order: Bureaucratic Management and the Limits of Presidential Power (Princeton University Press 2021). If we know anything about executive orders, it’s that they’re actions that the president takes alone. But who […]

Notice & Comment

D.C. Circuit Review – Reviewed: Show, Not Tell

Judge Douglas Ginsburg is a formidable jurist. When he speaks, we’d all do well to listen. A few weeks ago, I heard Judge Ginsburg give a presentation to lawyers. He was asked what lawyers can do to improve their advocacy. His response surprised me. Mentioning Edward Tufte’s The Visual Display of Quantitative Information by name, […]

Notice & Comment

OMB Law Fellowship Program

It’s my pleasure to share that the U.S. Office of Management and Budget has created a Law Fellowship Program, under which law professors and attorneys employed by institutions of higher education; attorneys employed by State, local, or tribal governments; or attorneys employed by other qualifying institutions under 5 C.F.R. § 334.102 can rotate into OMB […]

Notice & Comment

Detention, Incarceration, and Administrative Law

We don’t often think of administrative law as a warden, but we should. Administrative law plays a crucial role in the detention of immigrants and in prison policy generally. The Administrative Law Review is hosting a virtual symposium on October 29, 2021 that will explore important questions about the role of administrative law in detention […]

Notice & Comment

Fall 2021 Recommendation Projects Are Underway! (ACUS Update)

ACUS has recently begun committee meetings on a slate of new recommendation projects targeted for completion at the 76th Plenary Session, scheduled for December 16, 2021. Descriptions and basic information about the projects (pulled from ACUS) appear below. Further information, including draft documents, are (or will become) available via the included links. Public Access to […]

Notice & Comment

“Gotta Catch ’em All”, by Jonathan Wiener

This is is the sixteenth post in a series on Michael Livermore and Richard Revesz’s new book, Reviving Rationality: Saving Cost-Benefit Analysis for the Sake of the Environment and Our Health. For other posts in the series, click here. In their incisive book Reviving Rationality, Michael Livermore and Richard Revesz document the bipartisan consensus across Presidents of […]

Notice & Comment

Disgust, Sincere Bias, and Bedeviled Cost-Benefit Analysis: A Psychological Response to Reviving Rationality, by Arden Rowell

This is is the fifteenth post in a series on Michael Livermore and Richard Revesz’s new book, Reviving Rationality: Saving Cost-Benefit Analysis for the Sake of the Environment and Our Health. For other posts in the series, click here. About a decade ago, as a result of some unexpectedly icy roads between Illinois and Tennessee, my spouse […]

Notice & Comment

“Distributional Guardrails?”, by Matt Adler

This is is the fourteenth post in a series on Michael Livermore and Richard Revesz’s new book, Reviving Rationality: Saving Cost-Benefit Analysis for the Sake of the Environment and Our Health. For other posts in the series, click here. In their terrific new book, Reviving Rationality, Mike Livermore and Ricky Revesz describe the emergence of a bipartisan […]

Notice & Comment

Cost-Benefit Conventions, by Jennifer Nou

*This is the thirteenth post in a series on Michael Livermore and Richard Revesz’s new book, Reviving Rationality: Saving Cost-Benefit Analysis for the Sake of the Environment and Our Health. For other posts in the series, click here. Does the executive branch have an obligation to abide by past practices when it comes to cost-benefit analysis (CBA)? […]