Notice & Comment

AdLaw Bridge Series

Notice & Comment

Administrative Law SSRN Reading List, September 2022 Edition

Here is the September 2022 Edition of the most-downloaded recent papers (those announced in the last 60 days) from SSRN’s U.S. Administrative Law eJournal, which is edited by Bill Funk. Testing Textualism’s ‘Ordinary Meaning’ by Tara Leigh Grove (90 George Washington Law Review 101 (2022)) The National Security Consequences of the Major Questions Doctrine by Timothy Meyer & Ganesh Sitaraman (Michigan Law Review forthcoming) Is Criminal Law Unlawful? by Paul […]

Notice & Comment

Ponomarenko on Taking Federal Administrative Law to the Local Level

As someone whose research focuses on federal administrative law but teaching package also includes state and local government law, I love following the scholarship on state administrative law. The scholars who write on state administrative law—Miriam Seifter comes immediately to mind—are so creative. Few administrative law scholars, however, focus on local governments. That’s a real […]

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Narrowing Deference Through Internal Administrative Law

In our contribution to the 2021 Duke Law Journal administrative law symposium on Chevron deference, Shoba Sivaprasad Wadhia and I make the case against Chevron deference in immigration adjudication, and we argue that the federal regulators should shift the default from adjudication to rulemaking to make major immigration policy at the agency level. Among other things, shifting […]

Notice & Comment

Narrowing Chevron’s Immigration Domain

As Aaron Nielson has previously noted on the blog, the 2021 edition of the Duke Law Journal‘s annual administrative law symposium will focus on the future of Chevron deference, with the lead article by Kristin Hickman and Aaron Nielson entitled Narrowing Chevron‘s Domain. Hickman and Nielson argue that the Supreme Court should consider eliminating Chevron […]

Notice & Comment

Federalist Society Executive Branch Review Panel: Restoring the Legislative Power to Congress

Earlier this week, I participated virtually on a panel on the nondelegation doctrine and Congress’s role in the modern administrative, as part of the Federalist Society’s Eighth Annual Executive Branch Review Conference. Here is the video: And here’s the description of the panel: In Federalist Paper No. 51, James Madison argued that a system of […]