Notice & Comment

AdLaw Bridge Series

Notice & Comment

Video and Draft Papers from Duke Law Journal Charting the New Landscape of Administrative Adjudication

Kent Barnett, Emily Bremer, and I were thrilled to organize the Duke Law Journal‘s fiftieth annual administrative law symposium, entitled Charting the New Landscape of Administrative Adjudication. As I blogged about last month, the live symposium took place on Valentine’s Day, and the draft papers and video from the symposium are now available online. Here is the […]

Notice & Comment

From Barnett and Blackman (and Wolters Kluwer): Free Access to “Introduction to Constitutional Law” 11-Hour Video Library

As part of my effort to identify online resources for teaching and learning administrative law, I thought I’d flag this post from Josh Blackman (and Randy Barnett). Their book Introduction to Constitutional Law is a great introduction and refresher to the main cases, and the accompanying videos are really engaging. The book, which comes with […]

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The Mortenson-Bagley-Wurman Debate on Nondelegation and Originalism

It’s no surprise that in today’s post Administrative Law SSRN Reading List, February 2020 Edition, Julian Mortenson and Nick Bagley’s forthcoming Columbia Law Review article Delegation at the Founding topped the charts, with more than 1,300 downloads. This is an important article that has the potential to reshape the debate on the nondelgation doctrine. One […]

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The Federalist Society’s Online Resources for Teaching and Learning Administrative Law

Especially during this time of social distancing and online teaching and learning, I thought I’d flag a few resources for learning administrative law online. In this post, I highlight the terrific resources the Federalist Society has produced in recent years. In the coming days and weeks, I will publish additional posts on other online resources, […]

Notice & Comment

What Does Federalism Have To Do with the Future of Qualified Immunity?

In a new article forthcoming in the Georgetown Law Journal, Aaron Nielson and I explore the answer(s) to this question. Here’s the abstract: Qualified immunity is increasingly controversial. But the debate about it is also surprisingly incomplete. Both qualified immunity’s critics and defenders have for too long overlooked the doctrine’s federalism dimensions. Yet federalism is […]

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Hastings Law Journal Symposium: Revolution or Evolution: Administrative Law in the Age of Trump, 2/21

This Friday, February 21st, the Hastings Law Journal will be hosting an administrative law symposium, and a number of our regular bloggers will be participating. You can register for the conference here. Here are the details from the Journal: Join Hastings Law Journal for our annual symposium at UC Hastings College of the Law. This year, we […]

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Fascinating Student Note on PDR Network and the Hobbs Act’s Jurisdiction-Stripping Provision

Last Term I covered PDR Network, LLC v. Carlton & Harris Chiropractic Inc. for SCOTUSblog. The question presented in PDR Network was whether the Hobbs Act strips district courts of jurisdiction to reconsider the validity of an agency’s legal interpretation of certain statutes. As I explained in my opinion analysis post, the Court ultimately dodged […]

Notice & Comment

Jotwell Administrative Law Section 2019 Year-End Review

As I first noted on the blog five years ago, the Administrative Law Section of Jotwell—The Journal of Things We Like (Lots)—is a terrific resource for administrative law practitioners and scholars. Jotwell’s Administrative Law Section publishes monthly a short review of a current piece of administrative law scholarship, usually authored by one of our contributing editors who are all leading […]