Notice & Comment

Author: Bridget C.E. Dooling

Notice & Comment

Introduction to Our Symposium on Jed Stiglitz’s “The Reasoning State”

*This is the introduction to a symposium on Jed Stiglitz’s “The Reasoning State.” For other posts in the series, click here. We’ve been on a roll with symposia here at the Notice & Comment Blog! Last week we wrapped a truly remarkable series of essays about Peter Shane’s Democracy’s Chief Executive, ably organized by Andrea Scoseria […]

Notice & Comment

Apportionments Revealed

I’m tagging in on the apportionments beat for a quick update. Prof. Matt Lawrence’s post explained that the 2022 Consolidated Apportionments Act required the Office of Management & Budget (OMB) to disclose materials related to apportionment decisions. (If “apportionments” is a word whose meaning escapes you, check out the instant-classic 2016 Yale Law Journal article by Prof. […]

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Call for Panel Proposals (by June 15): ABA Administrative Law Conference, Dec. 1-2, 2022

The ABA Section of Adminstrative Law and Regulatory Practice will host its annual administrative law conference on December 1-2, 2022. This is the Section’s signature event, and it attracts hundreds of government officials, scholars, and practitioners with two packed days of panels and programming. Following a survey of prior attendees, and as much as we […]

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Call for Abstracts — The Interconnected Regulatory Landscape: Exploring FDA’s Relationship with Other Domestic Regulators

Good opportunity for admin law, bureaucracy, regulation, health law, and FDA-regulated products practitioners & scholars (just to name a few!). The Food & Drug Law Journal is convening a symposium on FDA’s relationship with other domestic regulators. From the call: This Symposium will offer wide-ranging discussion, among scholars and practitioners, of the actual and the […]

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A Study To Evaluate OIRA Review of Treasury Regulations, by Kristin E. Hickman & Bridget C.E. Dooling

For most federal agencies, centralized review by Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) and regulatory impact analysis have been a routine part of the regulatory process for more than 40 years.[1] Not so in the tax context. When OIRA was in its infancy, OIRA Administrator Christopher DeMuth and Treasury Department General Counsel Peter Wallison […]

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Benefits of a Rowdy Bureaucracy

*This is the third post in a series on Andrew Rudalevige’s new book, By Executive Order: Bureaucratic Management and the Limits of Presidential Power. For other posts in the series, click here. Perhaps because they bear the president’s signature and don’t require ratification, executive orders are considered to be entirely within the president’s control. But early in […]

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Introduction to Our Symposium on Rudalevige’s By Executive Order

Welcome to our second symposium of the month!* We close out October with a series of essays reacting to Prof. Andrew Rudalevige‘s By Executive Order: Bureaucratic Management and the Limits of Presidential Power (Princeton University Press 2021). If we know anything about executive orders, it’s that they’re actions that the president takes alone. But who […]

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OMB Law Fellowship Program

It’s my pleasure to share that the U.S. Office of Management and Budget has created a Law Fellowship Program, under which law professors and attorneys employed by institutions of higher education; attorneys employed by State, local, or tribal governments; or attorneys employed by other qualifying institutions under 5 C.F.R. § 334.102 can rotate into OMB […]

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OIRA the Angel; OIRA the Devil

*This is the fourth post in a series on Michael Livermore and Richard Revesz’s new book, Reviving Rationality: Saving Cost-Benefit Analysis for the Sake of the Environment and Our Health. For other posts in the series, click here. In their most recent book, Reviving Rationality, Mike Livermore and Ricky Revesz build on their record of support for […]

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Six things I love about M-21-24

OMB issued a memo yesterday entitled “Promoting Public Trust in the Federal Government and Effective Policy Implementation through Interagency Review and Coordination of the American Rescue Plan Act.” OMB numbers some of its memos and this one is M-21-24. Apropos of my tendency to gush about OMB and the relative paucity of click-baity listicles on […]

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Going Through Regulatory Withdrawal

If I taught a class called “Advanced Regulatory Maneuvers,” regulatory withdrawals would have to be on the syllabus. Withdrawing a proposed rule that an agency previously issued but has not yet finalized effectively erases the earlier proposal, requiring an agency to start over if it wants to proceed with a rule. A withdrawal communicates to […]

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New ACUS Project on “Mass, Computer-Generated, and Fraudulent Comments”

Last April, the Administrative Conference of the United States (ACUS) called for proposals for a new project on “Mass, Computer-Generated, and Fraudulent Comments in Agency Rulemaking.” The request for proposals (RFP) signaled that ACUS was looking for a team of research consultants to take on the work, in concert with the Conference’s Research Director. Assembling […]