Notice & Comment

Author: Seth Davis

Notice & Comment

D.C. Circuit Review – Reviewed: Planes, Trains, and Arbitration Clauses – D.C. Circuit Publishes Six Opinions to Ring in the New Year

Last week the D.C. Circuit published six opinions in an early celebration of the new year. The FAA, Amtrak, and arbitration clauses all made appearances in a set of fact-bound opinions with few precedential highlights. I’ve read them all so you don’t have to.  For readers of this blog, last week’s highlights included administrative law […]

Notice & Comment

D.C. Circuit Review – Reviewed: A Moot Suit and a Big Announcement – In-Person Oral Arguments are Coming Back

The D.C. Circuit published only one opinion this week, resolving a long-running suit that had become moot. The Court also announced that it will reopen for in-person arguments on December 1, 2021. Court watchers can find the protocols here. Members of the general public won’t be allowed to attend in-person, but can watch arguments on […]

Notice & Comment

Of Independence, Sovereignty, Accountability, and Other Sleights of Hand

Administrative law doctrine and scholarship has traditionally treated agencies as unitary entities and focused upon the proper allocation of authority among agencies, the President, Congress, and the courts. Recently, however, scholars have begun to unlock the “black box” of agency design to identify and evaluate the ways in which administrative law rules allocate decisionmaking authority […]

Notice & Comment

Federalism and Final Agency Action

On March 30th, the Supreme Court will hear oral argument in United States Army Corps of Engineers v. Hawkes Co., Inc. The question presented concerns “final agency action”: Is the Army Corps’ determination that the Clean Water Act applies to waters on private land “final agency action” reviewable under the Administrative Procedure Act? According to […]

Notice & Comment

Administrative Law and the Law School Curriculum

Over at PrawfsBlawg Jay Wexler explains that Boston University School of Law has made Administrative Law part of the required 1L curriculum. This decision, and reactions to it, have me thinking about where and when we offer Administrative Law to law students and what we teach them when we do. I’ve just finished another semester […]

Notice & Comment

State Litigation Against Presidential Administration

Sometimes a gridlocked Congress means that an energized President and ambitious state lawmakers compete to solve the Nation’s social problems. But this competition may not make for innovative solutions. Instead, it may make more for more gridlock. Consider Texas v. United States. There a cadre of states have sued to stop President Obama’s deferred action […]

Notice & Comment

The Chevron Shuffle and Legislative History

This post’s about a puzzling opinion from the D.C. Circuit. The puzzle has to do with the Chevron two step and legislative history. This puzzle’s important, and not just for King v. Burwell. In Council for Urological Interests v. Burwell (CUI), published last week and available here, the D.C. Circuit shuffled between one view and another […]