Notice & Comment

Author: Aaron L. Nielson

Notice & Comment

D.C. Circuit Review – Reviewed: An Examination of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit

A couple of weeks back I finished D.C. Circuit Review — Reviewed as a weekly series.* If you’re interested, I’ve penned a short essay about what I’ve learned from five year of posts. I’ve also attached the posts as an appendix so they are available in a single (control-F searchable) place. Here’s the abstract: Thanks […]

Notice & Comment

The Minor Questions Doctrine

I’m pleased to report that the University of Pennsylvania Law Review has agreed to publish my latest article: The Minor Questions Doctrine. Here’s the abstract: Few aspects of administrative law are as controversial as the major questions doctrine—the exception to Chevron deference that bars courts from deferring to an agency’s otherwise reasonable interpretation of an […]

Notice & Comment

D.C. Circuit Review – Reviewed: Year Six?

Nope!* * It’s been a good run. If you’re interested, here is the complete list of posts: August 2015:   Obamacare Round 3?   King Solomon and the APA   “It was the best of times ….”   Can You Keep a Secret? September 2015:   The Second Most Important Court?   The Future of […]

Notice & Comment

The Law Has Lost a Giant: The Legacy of Judge Stephen Williams

I’ve often said that this is the greatest opening line in the history of the D.C. Circuit: “In the Spring of 1985, as Mikhail Gorbachev was assuming the duties of General Secretary and inaugurating perestroika, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission launched its own restructuring of the natural gas industry.” The sentence reflects the best of the […]

Notice & Comment

D.C. Circuit Review – Reviewed: Drip Drip Drip

The most important news this week in the world of law is that someone is leaking information about internal Supreme Court deliberations: This is a bad development. Leaks can destroy collegiality — collegiality that takes a great deal effort to build and which facilitates intellectual engagement. Leaks also can lead to self-censorship; if the justices […]

Notice & Comment

D.C. Circuit Review – Reviewed: Postage Stamps

I learned something new this week: you can order custom postage stamps with an image of your own choosing.* I also learned something else: the Postal Service restricts what types of images you can use. Another thing: no politics are allowed. And one more: this make-your-own-postage program is going to end in a few days. […]